Hand

 “All nurses are different. Some just jab the needle into you, and it hurts.”

-A patient

White Gloves by jparadisi

White Gloves by jparadisi

Few things make me feel more successful as a nurse than when a patient says, “That was the most painless port access, (IV start, or injection) I’ve ever had.” I can never promise a patient I won’t hurt them, but when I don’t, it makes my day. I strive for a gentle hand. 

In art the term “hand” describes the workmanship of an artist, and nurses often tell patients going to surgery, “You’re in good hands,” referring to a surgeon’s skill with a scalpel. But “hand” refers to the way we treat people too.

Whether educating patients about chemotherapy and radiation regimens, explaining home medication administration, or simply discussing current events, it’s important to remember that even the most optimistic patient is emotionally fragile. Tone of voice, the abruptness of an encounter, and our choice of words all contribute to the “hand” we touch them with emotionally. Too heavy of a conversational hand can pierce a patient’s soul as painfully as any needle or scalpel.

I forgot this during a shift memorable for both the number and acuity of its patients. Everyone had complex questions about their care. I enjoy patient education; however, this shift I was doing so much that I began pulling information from my knowledge base as if it were files from a computer. By this, I mean remotely. I wasn’t paying attention to hand, my personal touch.

During the course of an assessment, a patient revealed she wasn’t taking a prescribed home medication because of its side effects. The patient also reported a symptom, which I recognized was caused by the discontinuation of the home medication she’d just mentioned, and I just sort of blurted out my observation. Immediately, I regretted my heavy-handedness as I saw this otherwise optimistic patient crumble nearly to the point of tears. I had carelessly broken a tender reed.

Needing to make amends, I sat on the rolly stool, and I apologized. I complimented her involvement in her care, and her ability to sense changes in her body. I also apologized for abruptly responding to the discontinuation of her medication. I regained my gently touch, she forgave me, and we devised with a care plan.

I hope I made up careless hand. I had hurt her as if I’d jabbed her with a needle.

Nurses and Pharmacists: For Valentine’s Day All We Want Is Respect

I’ve written before that I am happily married to a pharmacist. Sometimes when we come home from work, we commiserate together in shorthand about our hospital shifts. When we are grumpy, we play “I work harder than you do,” in which we childishly throw out episodes from our day to prove who had a harder shift and should buy dinner. Usually I win, because as a nurse, I am the one working hands-on with patients. However, I concede that being responsible for every medication calculation, preparation, and drug interaction (and more) is a tough and stressful job. Safe medication administration is a foundation of patient care. I also acknowledge that nurses are occasionally a little difficult to work with (I  was actually once present for a code blue when a stool softener was ordered STAT).

Anyway, for David and all my pharmacist friends, this one’s for you. Special thanks to the friend who brought this video to my attention.

Late Entry: I did have the Pharmacy Respect video here earlier, but I have removed it. Unfortunately, I cannot unlink it from the YouTube playlist that I do not want to post to this site. So, watch the Pharmacy Respect video, click the link or go to YouTube and type Pharmacy Respect into the search bar. It will come right up. Sorry for the inconvenience, but it is a cute video.

New Series, Color-Coded For Your Safety Published on Die Krankenschwester

Four Shades of Grey from Color-Coded For Your Safety, by JParadisi and posted on Die Krankenschwester

Color-Coded For Your Safety is my latest series of images posted on the blog, Die Krankenschwester, which I also author. The series considers identity. Color-Coded for Your Safety consists of nine photographs of flip-top caps collected from medication vials, which are commonly used in hospital pharmacies. Color-coding medication vials is a visual aid created by pharmaceutical companies (medication manufacturers) assisting pharmacists, nurses and physicians to identify the medications they administer to patients. The goal is to prevent patients from accidentally receiving the wrong medication. Each cap color represents a different medication.