Shift Observations: When It Feels Like Work

Our fatigue is often caused not by work, but by worry, frustration and resentment.

Dale Carnegie

Derail photo by jparadisi 2012

I had one of those patient assignments I couldn’t get control of. The care plan refused to move forward in its time frame, despite fervent pushing. There were unexpected variables: The patient possessed few usable veins; those she had were challenging, and time was lost starting her IV. The infusion wasn’t available when expected. Once it started, the vein blew. No harm occurred to the patient, but another vein had to be found, another IV had to be started, all at the cost of more lost time. It became clear the patient was not going to be on time for a scheduled procedure in another office. This happens once in a while in the ambulatory setting, mostly because the parties doing the scheduling are unaware or overly ambitious about what can be done in a limited amount of time.

I called the RN at the office scheduling the procedure, explaining our patient would be late. Then I returned to my post, watching her IV, willing it to stay open and unobstructed. The expression on my face must have been intense: I didn’t notice our nursing student enter the unit until he came to me and asked, “Tough day?”

This student returned to school to pursue a career in nursing. His commitment, work ethic and accountability are rare. Despite raising a family, and going to school full-time, he finds things to do above and beyond expectations. He’s smart and funny too, with a natural ability to get along with our crusty, all female staff. He’s going to be a great nurse.

“Yeah, it’s a tough day,” I replied. Remembering how hard this nursing student works I realized, instead of whining, I had the opportunity, a choice, to show some professionalism. I explained some of the factors making the assignment difficult. Without thinking, out of my mouth came the words, “Solving the problems is what I do as an RN. This is what I’m paid to do. When things go wrong, that’s when my education kicks in full throttle. I’m here when the work is slow, for the times when things get tough.”

The student smiled and said, “Yeah, that’s what makes it a profession. It’s like when I had my company, the job was easy until there was a problem. That’s when it felt like work.”

He’s going to make a great nurse.

5 thoughts on “Shift Observations: When It Feels Like Work

  1. You know I’ve never thought of it in that way, but it’s right on.

  2. An excellent reminder of what it’s really like. Thank You!

  3. Pingback: The Best In Nurse Blogs: Welcome Back Emergiblog Edition! | The Millionaire Nurse Blog

Comments are closed.