Art & Nursing: At Scrubbed In Blog & in AJN

Because I’m an artist, one of the pervading themes of this blog is art.

This week, I had the pleasure of being recognized, along with two other artists who are nurses, in an interview by Meaghan O’Keefe, RN for Scrubbedin (the Blog) at Nurse.com. Each of us share our perspective on art and nursing, and why they are uniquely paired.

In their April 2015 issue, the American Journal published Yazzie, a painting from my Urban Horses series, along with a short essay about selecting art for the health care setting. I’m honored to have a collection of my paintings and monotypes hanging the the oncology infusion clinic where I used to work, giving me a special opportunity to pair art and nursing in patient care.

JParadisi RN Painting in AJN Art of Nursing

The April 2015 issue of the American Journal of Nursing is available. On page 43 of the print version is Yazziea painting I made The Art of Nursing Column. In the accompanying  text I discuss the challenge hanging original art in a health care setting. You can view a pdf of Yazzie and the accompanying text at AJN Online.

The  paintings on exhibit in the clinic, including Yazzie, are for sale. I will donate 20% of the sales prices  to The Knight Cancer Challenge, dedicated to raising research money to find the cure for cancer. The fundraising ends in February 2016. You can learn about the Knight Cancer Challenge by watching their cool video here.

If you watched the recent airing on PBS of The Emperor of All Maladies, you’ll recognize Dr. Brian Druker, the inventor of Gleevec, as the face of OHSU cancer research.

If wishes were horses, this 17-piece collection titled, Works on Paper: Monotype Prints and Paintings would be purchased and donated to the walls of the clinic where they are now hanging, so the patients can continue to enjoy them.

 

This Week: EHRs & The Nurse’s Voice, Collusion & A Nurse Asks for Help

A physician, standing in a busy hospital unit, was overheard telling a resident,

“If you want to be certain something gets done for your patient, find the busiest nurse in the unit, and ask her to do it.”

It’s true, nurses thrive on getting the job done.

Here at JParadisiRN blog, things are hopping. Besides transitioning to a new employment opportunity, I’ve been busy writing, and making art.

In case you missed it, Do EHRs Rob Nurses of Voice and Oversimplify Descriptions of Patient Care? is the title of my latest post for Off the Charts, the blog of the American Journal of Nursing. While I mostly love EHRs, the voice of bedside nursing is lost by reducing the nurse’s note to check boxes and smart phrases. However, not everyone agrees. What’s your opinion? BTW, the I made the collage illustrating the post; the text is from Florence Nightingale’s Nursing Notes.

Weekly, I write and illustrate a post for TheONC, The Oncology Nurse Community website. This week’s post, Which Came First, The Chicken or the Nurse? ponders the lack of privacy and personal space for nurses.

Chapter 13 of The Adventures of Nurse Niki is posted. In  Collusion, Niki’s creative solution for managing her patient’s under medicated post-surgical pain last week yields an unexpected result, in which she coaches a father how to ask his daughter’s surgeon to treat her pain. How do you handle similar situations?

I receive comments from nurses, some asking questions. A recent comment submitted to an older post, Of Medication Errors and Brain Farts is a single line,

I made a med error and lost my job how do you go on

If the comment touches you, please reach out with support and advice for this nurse in replies to this comment. Let’s help out a fellow nurse, yes?

Is There a Difference Between Nurse Burnout and Boredom? This Month’s Post for Off the Charts

This month, in my post for Off the Charts, the blog of the American Journal of Nursing, I consider the differences between nursing burnout and boredom. There’s a great discussion going on in the comments.

Here’s the back-story to Differentiating Nurse Burnout from Boredom:

Nurse Niki received an email from a nursing student asking Niki her thoughts on various subspecialties of pediatric nursing (I am charmed that Nurse Niki gets emails). The student was concerned with the possibility of some subspecialties being more boring than others. Her comment coincided with my current change of employers, which I’d previously written about, also for Off the Charts. Surprisingly, or maybe not, I find myself recharged by the change, even though I hadn’t initiated it.

Read the post at Off the Charts and leave a comment. We’d love to know your opinion!

I NEED HELP! The Adventures of Nurse Niki Chapter 8 is Posted

The Adventures of Nurse Niki
The Adventures of Nurse Niki

The Adventures of Nurse Niki Chapter 8 is posted.

In this episode, Niki’ makes breakfast plans with her friend from ER, Corey, and her PICU patient suffers an unexpected, early morning code.

Off the Charts has this to say about The Adventures of Nurse Niki:

This blog is made up entirely of first-person episodes told by a fictional nurse named Niki. Each episode is short, detailed, and engaging, and it’s easy to keep up with it on a regular basis, or quickly catch up if you haven’t yet read any episodes.

                      Jacob Molyneux, AJN senior editor/blog editor

You can interact with Nurse Niki on her Facebook page, and don’t forget to “Like” it. Show Niki some love!

Many thanks to the readers following The Adventures of Nurse Niki, the retweets of  @NurseNikiAdven, and those who not only Like Nurse Niki’s Facebook Fan Page, but post comments too. The support is very much appreciated!

“The Kid Has the Nicest Parents” Chapter 7 of The Adventures of Nurse Niki is Posted!

The Adventures of Nurse Niki
The Adventures of Nurse Niki

The Adventures of Nurse Niki Chapter 7 is posted.

This week, Niki ponders physiological dependency on caffeine, expresses gratitude for having a healthy child, and receives an ominous report on her patient in the PICU.

I want to give a shout out to Off the Charts, the blog of the American Journal of Nursing, thanking them for including The Adventures of Nurse Niki in a Blog Round Up with some remarkable nurse bloggers. An excerpt from the post says some really nice things about Nurse Niki:

Episode six is now up at The Adventures of Nurse Niki, a newish blog written by Julianna Paradisi (her other blog is JParadisi RN). This blog is made up entirely of first-person episodes told by a fictional nurse named Niki. Each episode is short, detailed, and engaging, and it’s easy to keep up with it on a regular basis, or quickly catch up if you haven’t yet read any episodes.

Thanks JM!

You can interact with Nurse Niki on her Facebook page, and don’t forget to “Like” it. Show Niki some love!

Many thanks to the readers following The Adventures of Nurse Niki, the retweets of  @NurseNikiAdven, and those who not only Like Nurse Niki’s Facebook Fan Page, but post comments too. The support is very much appreciated!

You Can Find Me Here: AJN’s Blog Off The Charts

Nurses Day 2013 has come and gone. I had a particularly good one, which I wrote a blog post The Best Nurses Day Gift: Enough Time for Patients for Off The Charts, the blog of the American Journal of Nursing.

Illustrating this post is my painting, What’s Left Behind.

Becoming More Like Medicine: Study Suggests Frequent Dental X-rays Increase Risk of Meningioma

photo by jparadisi

In recent years, I’ve had problems with dentists. Okay, it’s more like I have arguments with my dentist, who thinks I am the problem. We argue about the frequency of dental X-rays. I have maintained there is no reason to take bitewing X-rays every six months, and possibly ever, unless indicated by pain or symptoms.  Bolstering my side of the debate, I remind the dentist that I am a cancer survivor and yet, my doctor does not send me in for an X-ray when I develop a cough. In fact, I haven’t had a chest X-ray since my cancer diagnosis, and that was over a decade ago. Why do I need dental X-rays every six months?

With an exaggerated expression of patience, as if speaking to a difficult child, the dentist explains, “Dentistry is not like medicine. We do things differently.”

“Differently, as in you don’t use research to develop clinical standards?” I ask.

Next thing you know, I’m sitting through a very uncomfortable dental cleaning. What’s the name of that comedian who does the bit about dentists? He starts with,

“I go to the dentist, and he asks me if my gums bleed at home. I tell him no, but I don’t stick steak knives in my mouth at home either.”

 

I bring this up because the American Journal of Nursing published an article by Carol Potera, Older Dental X-rays Linked to Meningioma.

According to the article, adult patients diagnosed with meningiomas are nearly twice as likely to have had bitewing X-rays yearly, or even more frequently, than adults who are tumor free.”

It goes on to say that modern dental X-rays

“use much lower doses of radiation than those received by participants in this study,”

however, the study authors write:

“Efforts to moderate exposure to (ionizing radiation) to the head (are) likely to be of benefit to patients and health care providers alike.”

Finally, according to the article,

The American Dental Association, in its latest guidelines, asked dentists to weigh the risks and benefits associated with the use of dental X-rays at preset intervals.

Intuitively, I’ve known for a long time that frequent, routine dental X-rays are not a good idea. Now there is research to prove it.

Clutter Be Gone! Mental Clutter Off Switch at TheONC & AJN Releases iPad App Tomorrow

Shutting down the mental clutter of work after your shift is over is the topic of my post for TheONC this week. Included are Ideas for creating a “mental clutter shut-off switch,” and readers are responding with their own methods too. You can follow TheONC on Twitter @The_ONC and Facebook.

Going digital cuts down on physical clutter, and I am excited the American Journal of Nursing releases its iPad app tomorrow on iTunes. Tomorrow only, April 28, the app is free!